Reykjavik House

Doreen Gunkel

We have now arrived in Reykjavik Iceland.  Our housing arrangements for this leg were as interesting to us as the location of our visit.

In this travel blog series we will be exploring the place we stayed at a bit at a time, and I will be telling you about the location of our home away from home.

It seems that this location was possibly a manor house at sometime in the past. There were architectural features that did not seem to fit any other form of structure in our minds.

This house was located close to the government center of town. A nice traditional square was located across the street as well as a large eating area with restaurants that represented a different country. While we were there, we ate in America, France, England, and Spain.

About 100 yrds from the first square was a more modern designed square where people gathered for performances.  Kids used it for skateboarding and bicycling. The interesting thing about the kids there is that they were very respectful and non destructive. The refreshing look at another country’s youth was warming.

A few blocks up from our place, there was a most amazing museum. During building construction of a couple of modern buildings, one of the original settlement buildings (a longhouse) was discovered. The foundations of the new buildings were supported so that an archaeological excavation could be completed and a museum built before the new buildings were finished. 

If you turn left after coming out of the museum, you will see a glass plate in the sidewalk. Walking over and looking down, you will see the long house from above.  

So now to look at the first pictures of the house.

Looking into the entryway.

Looking into the entryway.

This is the entryway into the house. The door goes out directly onto the street. Across the street is a four star restaurant that specializes in Icelandic dishes.

A cultural detail that was carried through out the northern countries we visited is, shoes are taken off and left at the door.

The chandelier at the top of the stairs.

The chandelier at the top of the stairs.

The most fantastic feature in the house is this chandelier. There were three with a ceiling detail above each on this floor.

The white oak hard wood floor at the top of the stairs.

The white oak hard wood floor at the top of the stairs.

The floors throughout the house where made of beautiful white oak.

looking int the kitchen from the entryway.

Looking into the kitchen from the entryway.

The kitchen in this house was a very pleasant place. There were lots of windows and the views were great all day and into the night. (More pictures of this room next week)

The entryway as seen from out room doorway.

The entryway as seen from out room doorway.

Looking from the sitting room in front of our door to the landing above the entry way.

The stairs to the lower areas of the house.

The stairs to the lower areas of the house.

The landing on the other side of our door had the most wonderful slate floors.

A real skeleton key!

A real skeleton key!

This was one more of the really awesome features of this house. They used skeleton keys for all of the doors.

The door is locked, Finally we can rest.

The door is locked, Finally we can rest.

The door closed and locked, we can finally rest after a long day of overload. More about our house next week. I hope this part of the tour was entertaining and informative.

The next post will be a return to the museum shots. This time we will be at the National Museum of Iceland. The photos over the next few weeks will be varied in content. Metal workers and wood carvers, and artisans, you will fine a great deal interesting!

I am so glad to have you along on this journey. It genuinely brings me joy! Please come back as you can.

Be well,

Doreen

2 thoughts on “Reykjavik House

  1. Greenland Gown ProjectGreenland Gown Project

    Thank you! I was just amazed by it. More wil be shown in the next post. Please do not hesitate to read the posts and comment. I love to hear what others think of what I am doing. It helps me improve.

    Doreen

    Reply

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