Tag Archives: archeology

Vadmal Display NMI

Doreen Gunkel

 

 

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Mini Me Welcoming You all to the National Museum of Iceland

This museum post consists of some of the textiles that are displayed in the museum. There are (three?) types of textile treatments for wearable items presented at the museum. In this post I will be covering vadmal.  Next week I will cover needle-coiling (nal Binding) and tabby weave.

For those of you who are not aware of vadmal or homespun fabric, it is a twill fabric that can have various patterns.

The examples here are based on a twill pattern. One of the more common patterns looks similar to the fabric in pair of blue jeans. If you look at the inside of most, you can plainly see this pattern.

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Spindles, Whorls,Twining Sticks

Doreen Gunkel

 Greetings

 Please enjoy today’s blog and if you have questions about any of the presentation, please leave them in a reply at the end of the blog. I will be happy to look into it for you and pass the answer back along. If you would prefer to discuss the topic in a more private way, please contact me at  .

These will be the last museum pieces from Greenland for a little while. The rest are of a textile nature and I am still working on those. I will post some of them as soon as I may.

The current crop of pictures contain a goodly amount of spindle whorls and some spindles as well as twining sticks. I think it is interesting that there are so many differing shapes and sizes of tools used to produce the yarns to allow the Greenlanders to survive. It would seem, from the photos, that in Greenland every woman who spun had a different idea of what the tools should look and feel like.

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Our Greenland home

Doreen Gunkel

This week’s travel photos are going to give you a little taste of what our living arrangements were in Nuuk, Greenland .

We decided to stay in hostels during our trip to try to economize as they have kitchen facilities available as well as being, for the most part, less expensive than a hotel. During the trip we discovered an app that is very helpful in finding these hidden jewels. ( Air BnB )It was a good experience because we were able to find full hostels and also individuals that might just have a spare room or two to rent to visitors.

All of the hosts we stayed with were friendly and willing to help a traveler to the area get the most out of the journey by discussing customs, etiquette, and anything else we might want to know, like where are the grocery stores!

Now, when most of us in the US think of a hostel, we think of the youth hostels that have the dorm type accommodations.  What we discovered is for a few dollars more, we could have a private room.

This week I wish to show you what our hostel was like.

Common room. The house was not very big, but, it was cozy.

Common room. The house was not very big, but, it was cozy.

This was The TV.  Yes, there was TV.

Yes! There was TV!

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Weaving tool photos (Greenland)

Doreen Gunkel

These photos were taken at the National Museum of Greenland.

Most items excavated during the long history of archeological exploration on this island had been removed to the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen. As the Island of Greenland has been culturally developing, compromises have been struck that have allowed many of the items taken to Copenhagen to be returned.

One of these developments is the National Museum of Greenland. It has a superb archive section as well as wonderful exhibit areas.

Danish Museum number 10580, commonly known as the Greenland Gown, was one of these returned items.

I will not be showing any photos of this item at this time, nor of the small bits of textile. As of yet, I have not finished my examination of them and they will be included in an upcoming piece of research.

In this batch of photos you will find many items that were included in Woven Into The Earth (WIE) by Else Ostergard. I will try to identify them and the page number as I present each photo.

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Needles of various sizes, needle/awl sharpeners, awls (or stilettos), and weaving pins. More information, WIE (Ostergard) Pg. 111-11

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Opinions please

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings from this side of the New Year. I hope all of you had a safe entry to 2015.

I have a couple of things that I am wishing to gather some opinions on.

I have been approached by a blogger who has an interest in medieval textiles for use in manuscripts. He wishes to do some interviews of myself about the project. (yes, I will post his web address at a later time)

My question is this… Would anyone be interested in having an interview done for this blog?

Another idea I have for this web page is to do audio sessions concerning the project itself. The origins, the processes, just basically the information I speak on during my face to face presentations. These would be posted to You Tube and also here.

Would this be anything that would be beneficial?

And the last question…

Would videos of the various processes I have rediscovered be of help to you?

 

Please reply in the reply block at the bottom. I always love to hear what you, as followers, would find helpful and would like to see.

Be well,

Doreen

Ok…HELP!!!!

Greenland Gown Project

AHHHHH!

Well, I need to write even if it is just to be able to sleep tonight. I hope you will indulge me.

As I have been setting here processing the never ending piles of wool, I came upon a rather scratchy thought. Just how much wool do I need to process to get to the end of the tunnel?

My difficulty is that I do not completely understand the fabric I am recreating. I also do not understand weaving on a common floor loom let alone a Warp Weighted Loom. I have just enough knowledge of weaving to be dangerous.

Now mind you, I am recreating some of the techniques used to build the tools and fabric related to bring this project to completion. But, I am not an all knowing person. I need help…..

How do I figure the amount of wool needed to make the requisite fabric? HELP!

Is this fabric (2/2 twill) a warp faced fabric?

I guess this will not be the only two questions, but these are the most pressing ones at this point.

Again… HELP!

<Grin>

No Really….. Help.

Hubby says, “Good judgement comes from experience which comes from bad judgement.”

 

Be well,

D

 

Update 3/12/2014 (search for fleeces)

Greenland Gown Project

Hello friends.

Just a short note to let you all know that life and the work is ongoing. Nothing new on the research from as I am concentrating all of my energy and available time to getting the fleece processing done for the Navajo Churro fleeces.

This does not mean that my mind has stopped working. There is something very cathartic about doing repetitive hand work. It frees your mind to travel to other places almost effortlessly.

So, my mind is now looking towards the search for Icelandic fleeces. In order for the fleeces to work for this project, they must come directly from Iceland or from a North American supplier who’s blood lines run back to the original flock transported to Canada in the late 80’s, early 90’s.

I have been able to get wonderful support from my churro fleece supplier who has given me a low price for very good fleeces. It is my hopes that I can find an Icelandic breeder that would be willing to be a part of this project and offer to sell their fleece for a good price to help support this large experimental archaeology project.

So this and the loom construction are the two main topics of my bored brain at this time.

If there is anyone out there who would like to help with the fleece issue, could you please contact me at doreen@greenlandgown.org

Be well, All of you, until we meet here again.

Doreen

The world is Fleece

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings from the wool shed!

Today I am finally kicking off a major campaign to get the twelve Churro fleeces needed for the first weaving done so that Anna, the project spinner, can do her part in the early summer.

As I have been mentally getting ready. the next steps have been working their way into my head and so the loom construction will be next. Continue reading

Why Oil a Fleece?

Greenland Gown Project

Hi everyone! Glad to see you here!

This past week I was asked an interesting set of questions on the face book Greenland Gown Research/Recreation page. I gave a Cliff Notes version of the answer and so would like to expand on that information.

The question and request is as follows. “Tell me about oiling fleece. Why does one do it and does it need to be done on all fleeces?”