Tag Archives: card

Why Oil a Fleece?

Greenland Gown Project

Hi everyone! Glad to see you here!

This past week I was asked an interesting set of questions on the face book Greenland Gown Research/Recreation page. I gave a Cliff Notes version of the answer and so would like to expand on that information.

The question and request is as follows. “Tell me about oiling fleece. Why does one do it and does it need to be done on all fleeces?”

Wool Oiling Process

Greenland Gown Project

As I am getting started processing the wool for spinning, I have found in the past that I had problems controlling the static as I live in an area that has a normal lack of humidity, about 13% or less most of the year. Also, There is the problem of waste as the slightly shorter usable fibers would tangle and become difficult to pull into tops. My past solution was to use a spray bottle of water which helped with the static but did nothing to mitigate the waste.

I was talking with my fleece supplier recently and mentioned my dilemma. She said that I should look for spinning/carding oil as that is what she uses occasionally to keep these issues in check and so do the mills. As it had been awhile since she had bought any, that was all of the information she could give me .

With the little information I had, I went looking for a commercial supplier and found none that did not sell in less that large quantity and very few of those. My next endeavor was to look at a paper that I had come across in the search. In this paper I found recipes for several kinds of oil that were used along with varying methods of oil distribution. It is called “Wool Oiling” “Serial 475 Edition 1″ The publisher is “International Textbook Company”. A PDF of this section can be found through the University of Arizona and a search of the internet. (If you are unable to find it, please contact me for help) This is a

Fleece oiling experiment

Greenland Gown Project

Hello everyone. I know that I have been quiet these past days….Things at the house have taken priority for a bit. I have been working on the project though and will have the results of the new experiments out for all to see soon.

The topic this time will be lubricating scoured fibers and comparing various techniques from removing the dirt while leaving the lanolin (grease) in the raw fleece and how the combs react to this to scouring the fleece and adding carding/spinning oil to it and how that effects the combing.

I have found a recipe for the oil and have redacted the recipe (also will be covered in depth) to fit the smaller quantities of fleece I am doing at a time. I am liking the results so far.

The last time I tried to comb a raw fleece I found the grease clogged the combs up to the point I could not use them. Carding (which is out of culture for this project) may be different….

So, as you can see I have been working, just not able to write. Will write the results of the work I have been doing very soon.

The wool comb and it’s uses.

Greenland Gown Project

What is a Wool Comb and how is it used?

This week’s blog at www.greenlandgown.org contains information about the wool comb.

Wool Combs

Wool Combs

The wool comb came into existence very early in the northern European time frame.

Hand Carding Wool and Wool Cards

Greenland Gown Project

Hand Carding wool

There have been many questions over the time I have been working with the wool I use for this project. One of them has been why am I using combs instead of cards and some confusion about the difference.

So I decided to do a little hard topic research to educate not only myself but you as well. It will help me answer more intelligently next time I am asked these questions.

Gail Bennett was a great help in the research department this week and I would like to thank her.

I will now start with the most common item for fiber prep for spinning, the hand card. Continue reading

The Combing of Double Coated Fleeces

Greenland Gown Project

The fleeces used for this project are called double coated because they are made up of two types of fiber. One is a hair fiber with a larger diameter fiber and longer straighter length than the wool fiber which has a softer more crimped texture.

Currently, I am processing the Navajo Churro fleece. I am doing a process that in some circles is considered to be controversial. The traditional treatment, as I have been told, is for this double coated fleece to be spun with the hair and the wool fibers together and then woven into an item. The most common and well known of these is the durable wool rugs of the southwest. Continue reading