Tag Archives: fabric

Vadmal Display NMI

Doreen Gunkel

 

 

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Mini Me Welcoming You all to the National Museum of Iceland

This museum post consists of some of the textiles that are displayed in the museum. There are (three?) types of textile treatments for wearable items presented at the museum. In this post I will be covering vadmal.  Next week I will cover needle-coiling (nal Binding) and tabby weave.

For those of you who are not aware of vadmal or homespun fabric, it is a twill fabric that can have various patterns.

The examples here are based on a twill pattern. One of the more common patterns looks similar to the fabric in pair of blue jeans. If you look at the inside of most, you can plainly see this pattern.

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Spindles, Whorls,Twining Sticks

Doreen Gunkel

 Greetings

 Please enjoy today’s blog and if you have questions about any of the presentation, please leave them in a reply at the end of the blog. I will be happy to look into it for you and pass the answer back along. If you would prefer to discuss the topic in a more private way, please contact me at  .

These will be the last museum pieces from Greenland for a little while. The rest are of a textile nature and I am still working on those. I will post some of them as soon as I may.

The current crop of pictures contain a goodly amount of spindle whorls and some spindles as well as twining sticks. I think it is interesting that there are so many differing shapes and sizes of tools used to produce the yarns to allow the Greenlanders to survive. It would seem, from the photos, that in Greenland every woman who spun had a different idea of what the tools should look and feel like.

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Ok…HELP!!!!

Greenland Gown Project

AHHHHH!

Well, I need to write even if it is just to be able to sleep tonight. I hope you will indulge me.

As I have been setting here processing the never ending piles of wool, I came upon a rather scratchy thought. Just how much wool do I need to process to get to the end of the tunnel?

My difficulty is that I do not completely understand the fabric I am recreating. I also do not understand weaving on a common floor loom let alone a Warp Weighted Loom. I have just enough knowledge of weaving to be dangerous.

Now mind you, I am recreating some of the techniques used to build the tools and fabric related to bring this project to completion. But, I am not an all knowing person. I need help…..

How do I figure the amount of wool needed to make the requisite fabric? HELP!

Is this fabric (2/2 twill) a warp faced fabric?

I guess this will not be the only two questions, but these are the most pressing ones at this point.

Again… HELP!

<Grin>

No Really….. Help.

Hubby says, “Good judgement comes from experience which comes from bad judgement.”

 

Be well,

D

 

Update 3/19/14 Wool Processing and Research

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings from the wool shed!

I hope this finds you all doing well. It is spring! or some semblance of it here. Planting of roses and pruning of fruit trees has commenced.

So, I am continuing the hand processing of fleece to be spun into yarn for the weaving of the first dress. This dress is being made out of the Churro Breed of sheep.

I am going to be making a trip up to Wisconsin in May and I hope to meet a breeder there for the Icelandic fleece. Yes Kids It seems that it is time for me to start thinking about the next phase of the project.

Speaking of the next phase of the project. As I have little to do but think while combing the fleece I currently have, my mind has started travelling to the world of the loom. I will be building the loom myself this summer. I am starting from the ground up. Cutting of the timber for the parts cannot happen until June most likely. We have a permit system in out forests and the permits will not be available until May.

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Welcome Back!

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings!

Well, after a bit of an absence, the website that is, the project has taken a jump in fleece production.

The first fleece is on the edge of being finished with the first stage of cleaning and is in the box. Washing some of the next fleece today so it will be oiled and dry by the time I am ready for it.

The thoughts of the loom are working their way through my head. I have received loom dimensions from Antoinette Olson. This has been a great help in the planning.

I am so fortunate to have access to slash piles (these are piles of trees that are cut as the forest is thinned) of birch/aspen trees. I want to make the loom as authentic as possible as I have been trying to make the fabric as authentic as possible.  🙂

I will be gathering 4 more fleeces of the churro type in the next month or so as spring shearing is imminent. Then I think I will be done with the churro gathering.

So, as you can see, things are progressing.

Thank you for being he

The world is Fleece

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings from the wool shed!

Today I am finally kicking off a major campaign to get the twelve Churro fleeces needed for the first weaving done so that Anna, the project spinner, can do her part in the early summer.

As I have been mentally getting ready. the next steps have been working their way into my head and so the loom construction will be next. Continue reading

Why Oil a Fleece?

Greenland Gown Project

Hi everyone! Glad to see you here!

This past week I was asked an interesting set of questions on the face book Greenland Gown Research/Recreation page. I gave a Cliff Notes version of the answer and so would like to expand on that information.

The question and request is as follows. “Tell me about oiling fleece. Why does one do it and does it need to be done on all fleeces?”

Project update 12/2/2013 (Happy Holidays)

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings and happy holidays to all of you!

I am literally back on my feet again and the work on the project continues. I have been experimenting with a wool oil recipe that has or was used in commercial mills since the 1800’s if my information is correct.

This information will be the next blog post of substance. I hope to have the results of the first part of the work out to you in the next week. I just need to write the information up into a form that is readily understood.

Update 11/11/13

Greenland Gown Project

Hello all of you out there,

This is a short update to let you know that I am still alive and working.

Had a bit of a health issue these past weeks that slowed down the blogs. Nothing very serious and I am recovering well.

The next blog post of substance will be out in the next day or two. The topic is oiling wool after scouring to make carding and combing much easier and the wast less. This oiling process will wash out with the normal after spinning processes used to set the twist and cloth finishing.

Thank you again for your patience and continued support.

Be Well,

Doreen

Fulling or Felting

Greenland Gown Project

Greetings!

It is once again time for a blog post.

I just love research! It takes you to places that you would never think about going, yet they are supremely important to the whole outcome of your endeavor.

This week I would like to address the terms fulling and felting.

I found myself looking at material for the next paper and I started to see these terms very regularly interchanged in ways that had no real pattern. So, this is where I get distracted when I am doing research… SQUIRREL!

I found that I am not the only one confused by the terms. Not many writers, it would seem, can agree on things concerning this group of topics. I have basically distilled what I have seen for you. Please understand that this just means that I now add my own opinion to the pile.

As always, let’s start with the definition of each…..

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